18 November 2013

Celebrating Ten Years of the NRO

The Number Resource Organization (NRO) is celebrating its first decade as the coordinating body for the Regional Internet Registries (RIRs). Formalized through a Memorandum of Understanding  on 24 October 2003, the NRO was created by the four existing RIRs at the time: APNIC, ARIN, LACNIC, and the RIPE NCC, and later AFRINIC in 2005. The NRO was established to protect the unallocated Internet number resource pool, promote and protect the bottom-up policy development process for regional and global address management, and act as a focal point for Internet community input into the RIR system.

During the last ten years the NRO collaborated with a wide range of stakeholders to ensure the future growth and continued stability of the Internet, in particular, emphasizing the global transition to IPv6. The NRO is committed to continuing this cooperation and engages with intergovernmental associations and civil society groups in the interest of Internet development. As a key supporter of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) and the multistakeholder model of Internet governance, the NRO recently participated in the IGF 2013 in Bali, organizing two workshops and contributing to a number of forums.

As the Internet has grown and evolved, so has the NRO. Following a September strategic retreat in Montevideo, Uruguay, the NRO Executive Council (EC) announced the following Vision and Mission to guide the NRO’s activities:

The Vision is:

“To be the flagship and global leader for collaborative Internet number resource management as a central element of an open, stable, and secure Internet.”

The Mission is:

“To actively contribute to an open, stable, and secure Internet, through:

  • Providing and promoting a coordinated Internet number registry system
  • Being an authoritative voice on the multistakeholder model and bottom-up policy process in Internet governance
  • Coordinating and supporting the activities of the RIRs”

“The Vision and Mission represents the NRO’s continued commitment to work towards improving multistakeholder Internet cooperation,” said Paul Wilson, NRO EC Chair. “As the Internet continues to evolve and become a critical tool for communication and commerce at a national and global level, it’s vital that the Internet coordination community work with governments and other stakeholders as equal stewards for an Internet in the public trust.”

Comments are closed.